Start of main content

Proposed Policy on Summer Compensation

Description

The Report of the Task Force for Review of Stipends and Extra Compensation, which referenced Appendices C (revision to PPP-07 on extra compensation) and D (proposed policy on summer compensation), was approved by the Interim University Council (IUC) on July 11, 2016 following public comment.  However, as plans for implementation of these important policies were being developed by the President’s Executive Team and discussed further by the Interim-University Council at its September 12, 2016 meeting, it was deemed appropriate by the Interim-University Council that both appendices C and D be given a separate 30-day public comment period.

Requests for comments are requested for Appendix D (proposed policy on summer compensation).


Posted on: 9/19/2016
Closes on: 10/21/2016
Archived on: 10/21/2017

Primary Documents


The Request for Comments has been closed

Comments


I endorse the statement of the Council of Academic Chairs.



Commentor: Stacey Williams
Submitted on: 10/18/2016
On behalf of: Individual Faculty

I strongly disagree with any caps on the amount of salary faculty can earn during the summer. ETSU faculty salaries are abysmally low, and many faculty rely on summer activities, whether it be research, teaching, and/or service to supplement their salaries.



Commentor: Leslie McCallister
Submitted on: 10/17/2016
On behalf of: Individual Faculty

I endorse the statement of the Council of Academic Chairs.



Commentor: Theresa McGarry
Submitted on: 10/12/2016
On behalf of: Individual Faculty

I endorse the statement of the Council of Academic Chairs.



Commentor: Scott Honeycutt
Submitted on: 10/12/2016
On behalf of: Individual Faculty

I endorse the statement of the Council of Academic Chairs.



Commentor: Stephen Marshall
Submitted on: 10/11/2016
On behalf of: Individual Administrator

I endorse the statement of the Council of Academic Chairs.



Commentor: Angela Hilton
Submitted on: 10/11/2016
On behalf of: Individual Faculty

I endorse the statement of the Council of Academic Chairs.



Commentor: Gerald Deehan
Submitted on: 10/11/2016
On behalf of: Individual Faculty

I endorse the statement of the Council of Academic Chairs.



Commentor: Thomas Holmes
Submitted on: 10/11/2016
On behalf of: Individual Staff

I endorse the statement of the Council of Academic Chairs.



Commentor: Kevin O'Donnell
Submitted on: 10/10/2016
On behalf of: Individual Staff

I endorse the statement of the Council of Academic Chairs.



Commentor: Michael Cody
Submitted on: 10/10/2016
On behalf of: Individual Faculty

I endorse the statement of the Council of Academic Chairs.



Commentor: Cathy Galyon Keramidas
Submitted on: 10/10/2016
On behalf of: Individual Faculty

I endorse the statement of the Council of Academic Chairs.



Commentor: Deborah Slawson
Submitted on: 10/10/2016
On behalf of: Individual Staff

I endorse the statement of the Council of Academic Chairs.



Commentor: Robert Price
Submitted on: 10/10/2016
On behalf of: Individual Faculty

     Now that ETSU will no longer be under the auspices of TBR, the Council of Academic Chairs encourages significant revisions to Appendix D:  Proposed ETSU Policy on Summer Compensation.  The main issue of concern is that the provisions of the policy allow disparate earnings for “teachers” versus “researchers.”  In the present policy, teachers – via the Category I classification – can earn no more than 25% of their previous year’s 9-month salary through teaching.  In contrast, researchers in the Category III classification can earn up to 33% of their previous year’s 9-month salary. 

     The recent practice at ETSU has recognized this disparity in income potential between teachers and researchers, and so has allowed, as exceptions to the policy, teachers to earn additional income by teaching additional courses in “winter session” as well as by teaching additional summer sections (beyond the 8/32 rule) so long as the latter are offered in online formats. These exceptions have allowed teachers to earn significantly more than the maximum of 25%, but they are not formally recognized in “Appendix D,” and so would be disallowed by the policy in the absence of further revision after this period of public comment.  However, rather than codifying these complex and labrynthine exceptions, we recommend removing the cap on income earned through winter and summer course offerings altogether.  If for some reason this action is not allowable, then at a minimum these “exceptions” should be codified into future policy. 

     The 25% cap on Category II summer compensation should also be removed, in the absence of legal rationale to the contrary.  Removing the cap would allow for the possibility that teachers who are teaching during summer session, could also earn revenue in the form of service to the department, college, or university, as needed by the respective unit.  As the policy is currently implemented, ETSU administration has linked the two revenues (i.e., from Category I and Category II), such that income from Category II is disallowed when a faculty member’s earnings in Category I reaches a maximum of 25%.  To us this linkage makes no rational sense because the policy specifies no inherent linkage between incomes in the two categories. 

    We recognize that these remedies would adjust income potential such that teachers could in principle earn significantly more than researchers.  But, we also recognize that researchers on federal grants are limited by federal rule to 33% income during summer, which would prevent them from earning income through either Category I or II.  But researchers have access to revenue opportunities that teachers do not; namely ETSU’s “Incentive Compensation Plan,” which allows researchers to supplement their academic year income through state monies “saved” by using federal dollars to “buy out” of courses.  Of course, these researchers could also supplement their income through teaching in winter term.    



Commentor: Wallace Dixon
Submitted on: 10/8/2016
On behalf of: Council of Academic Chairs

I strongly disagree with any limitations on the amount of salary faculty can earn during the summer.  ETSU faculty salaries are ostentatiously below other institutions.  The Chronicle of Higher Education's faculty salary database indicates that Full Professors at Four-Year institutions earn on average over $111,000 (as of 2014).  Full professors at ETSU earn over $30,000 less on average.  I do not expect the institution to subsidize faculty efforts to gain extra-compensation, but if (either through contract work, grants, or extra teaching) one can increase their income while the institution benefits, in the form of indirect funds or revenue through enrollments, then it should be permitted. 



Commentor: William N. Duncan
Submitted on: 10/7/2016
On behalf of: Individual Faculty

I endorse efforts to ensure extra-compensation for those willing and able to offer courses beyond their normal courseload. This ensures that rewards remain commensurate with effort--a basic principle of meritocratic justice--and that faculty have opportunities to increase their annual salaries as a means of enhancing overall purchasing power and creating greater possibilities to think beyond a secure, but generally modest, middle class existence. Explicit recognition of this in policy also makes sense considering the new decentralized governing model that shall be operative. The specific percentage that extra-compensation may contribute to one's annual salary cap is negotiable, but I am in favor of extending that to a maximum compatible with university fiscal possiblities.



Commentor: Paul Kamolnick
Submitted on: 10/6/2016
On behalf of: Individual Faculty